Select languageSelect language
Institut für Physiologie und Pathophysiologie

Calcium Imaging

The dynamics of the intracellular calcium concentration regulates a broad spectrum of cellular processes like cell motility and intracellular transduction neuronal and hormonal signals. A misregulation of calcium dynamics is involved in the genesis and pathophysiology of numerous deseases, e.g. calcium induced apoptosis.

 

In particular the dynamics of intracellular calcium ion channels (inositoltrisphosphate, IP3R and ryanodine receptor, RyR) can only be analysed with optical methods. These are based on calcium sensitive dyes (Fluo-4, Fura-2), which only fluoresce with calcium ions bound.

 

Elementary Calcium Release Events

The smallest events of intracellular calcium signaling are openings of single or small groups of calcium channels. These elementary calcium release events (ECRE or "sparks") have a spatial extension of less than 1-2 µm, which means they are only detectable with confocal laser scanning microscopes. The temporal extension is in the range of 10-200 ms so that time-resolved measurements are only possible by scanning a single line or very small frames.

 

Figure 1: Confocal linescan image of ECREs through RyR type 2 in cardiac muscle cells

 

This technique is applied to study the effects of physiological modulations and diverse anesthetics on the ryanodine receptor. The detection of ECREs was automated using specifically adapted image processing techniques.

 

Figure 2: Analysis of intracellular calcium dynamics in coupled HepG2 cell clusters

Calcium Oszillation

Oscillations of the intracellular calcium concentration are known as a way of signal transduction between cells. Changes in amplitude and frequency of these oscillations can induce cell proliferation or the growth of synapses in neuronal networks.

 

We study purine receptor-mediated calcium oscillations in cultured HepG2 carcinoma cells and the effects of anesthetics on the dynamics of calcium oscillations in cultured neurons.

 


24.10.2017       13:30   /   INF 327, Seminar Room 1

 

Hypoxia and uterine contractions: Something old and something new

Prof. Dr. Susan Wray

Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom

  

24.10.2017       18:00   /   INF 410 (Med. Clinic), Auditorium

 

Calcium in the heart: in and out of control

Prof. Dr. David Eisner

Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing, University of Manchester, United Kingdom


(seminar of Heidelberg University Hospital and German Center for Cardiovascular Disease (DZHK); host: Prof. Dr. M. Hecker, Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Heidelberg University)

  

Neue Publikationen

*

AP-1 Oligodeoxynucleotides Reduce Aortic Elastolysis in a Murine Model of Marfan Syndrome. Mol Ther Nucleic Acids. 2017 Dec 15; 9: 69–79. Epub 2017 Sep 20. doi: 10.1016/j.omtn.2017.08.014

*

Allosteric inhibition of carnosinase (CN1) by inducing a conformational shift. J Enzyme Inhib Med Chem. 2017 Dec;32(1):1102-1110. doi: 10.1080/14756366.2017.1355793.

*

Transcription factor decoy technology: a therapeutic update. Biochem Pharmacol. 2017 Nov 15;144:29-34. doi: 10.1016/j.bcp.2017.06.122. Epub 2017 Jun 19. Review.

*

Subtype-specific differentiation of cardiac pacemaker cell clusters from human induced pluripotent stem cells. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2017 Oct 16;8(1):229. doi: 10.1186/s13287-017-0681-4.

*

Heteromeric channels formed by TRPC1, TRPC4 and TRPC5 define hippocampal synaptic transmission and working memory. EMBO J. 2017 Sep 15;36(18):2770-2789. doi: 10.15252/embj.201696369. Epub 2017 Aug 8

*

NO-sGC Pathway Modulates Ca2+ Release and Muscle Contraction in Zebrafish Skeletal Muscle. Front Physiol. 2017 Aug 23;8:607. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2017.00607. eCollection 2017.


Institut für
Physiologie und Pathophysiologie

Universität Heidelberg

Im Neuenheimer Feld 326

69120 Heidelberg

Telefon:+49 6221 54-4056
Telefax:+49 6221 54-6364
E-Mail:susanne.bechtel@
physiologie.uni-heidelberg.de